Button Text

Boss

BOSS

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Buzz

Badass Book of the month: “Smashing The Patriarchy”
Published in  
Buzz
 on  
December 12, 2021

Badass Book of the month: “Smashing The Patriarchy”

A book on the multi-faceted nature of modern feminism that is not afraid to highlight the hypocrisies that often impede our day-to-day critiques.

‘Smashing The Patriarchy’ is a book that resonates with a generation of women, who are not only demanding answers and accountability but redefining the meaning of feminism based on their experiential reality. Sindhu Rajasekaran’s new book dives into the idea of postfeminism and how it creates a space for women to redefine their idea of empowerment in more individualistic terms instead of collective. While it’s important to question the systemic structures of patriarchy, it is also important to identify our own personal emotional trauma and heal from it. As Rajasekaran states in her book, ‘Patriarchy is bad for women’s brain’ 


A rather important aspect of the book is that it is filled with personal and popular experiences but is backed by a plethora of references. The literature review is commendable and encourages readers to learn and read more. Rajasekaran writes bravely about the multi-faceted nature of modern feminism and is not afraid to highlight the hypocrisies that often impede our day-to-day critiques.


‘Smashing The Patriarchy’ provides a very fresh perspective on the stagnant standards of beauty in India. There is no surprise that the post-pandemic world is dictated by self-care routines and Instagram filters. We may have alienated ourselves from fair and lovely but have moved towards skin lightening creams for our butts and what companies call, ‘sensitive areas’. There is a blatant disregard for diversity and individuality in a society that has a fixed and homogenised standard of beauty. In such a context, the book also highlights a shift of narrative- how women have emerged as the narrators of their own stories. They are no longer afraid to talk about their desires and insecurities. Flaws are no longer their weakness- for some it’s empowerment and for others, it is content. Irrespectively, it all boils down to the idea of choice. The pursuit and rejection of beauty, as Rajasekaran explains is highly subjective. 


From caste to modern body politics, Rajasekaran brings together diverse voices of sociologists, historians, and women from different industries to give insight into the uniqueness of every woman’s experience. She encourages the readers to ask important questions, like, “In a collective movement, how are my experiences and thoughts accommodated without negating that of others? How do I challenge patriarchy without questioning the choices of other women? How do I not become the very thing I am fighting against? ”   


The book deconstructs complex experiences into an accessible language and in doing so assures its readers that the onus of change lies with them. Individual efforts, like healing from moral injury caused by patriarchal structures, small moments of courage, creating a network of support for those around you and most importantly, Much like any political theory, the idea of feminism demands to be contextualised to our lived reality and the truth is, all women live a life defined by its own challenges and structures. There is no one way to be a good feminist. There is, however, a need to create an inclusive movement that encourages women to identify the patriarchal structures that dictate their decisions and dismantle them. The essence that remains true throughout the book is the idea of choice. Whether you agree with her words or not, you can’t help but appreciate this engaging book for its fresh perspective, thorough research on matters that continue to affect us- from #Metoo to the women-led protests across the world.

No items found.